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Yeah I Remember That...

Travis and Pierre grew up in suburban Miami, FL in the 80s. We like to talk about stuff we remember. Things we loved and still love today. Shit we wish we could forget. Oh yea, there are obscenities in these podcasts, so hide grandma and the kids.
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Now displaying: Page 1
Jan 13, 2015

ugh

 

 

Yea Chad, we feel you. Re-watching all these old PSAs and horrific drug scare movies gave us a hangover too. And unlike you, we may have had more than a guilty sip of lite beer to get in good with the fat kid and the asian girl at the video store. 

Take a trip with us (so to speak) as Pierre and I venture back to the days when drug pushers were just outside every elementary school, Kaybee Toys, and playground jungle gym just waiting to get sub-10 year old suburban white kids hooked on hardcore drugs. Or at least, that's what Nancy Reagan and every cartoon, sitcom, kids show, and anything for little kids ever assumed was happening throughout the 1980s. 

This is a long one, but worth it. Also, Pierre swapped out the tin can and string for an actual semi-decent microphone, so enjoy his sultry voice, much in the way Chad Allen enjoyed Louis Gossett Jr's in the Fate Elevator™

Oh and I was wrong, he's totally still alive. My bad. 

Musical Interludes: "Right to say No" or "Be an Original" (need to know who performed this, please), "Because I Got High" by Afroman, "Fate Elevator" by Louis Gossett Jr and whatever deranged people wrote it. 

 

this is crack

2 Comments
  • almost three years ago
    Mr Mackey
    drugs r bad
  • two and a half years ago
    linica
    Thankfully I never saw the Chad Allen after school specials and no I do not think the He-man PSA's kept me off drugs, but I do think they served a purpose. Unfortunately, they didn't lead to a deeper discussion by society and parents, and were only taken at face value both then and now. They were a product of the latch-key generation where tv was left to raise the kids.